MountainHaven

Custom Hardwood Furniture & Accessories


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      The homeowner wanted to provide clear delineation of functional areas on the main level of the home. The main entry to the home is at one end of the space. Entering the home and turning to the left is a comfortable conversation space. The dining room is on the opposite end of the space from the main entry. All three spaces tended to melt together.

     The solution the homeowner wanted to implement was to divide the space with elements of timber framing. This approach added solid character to the space and provided clear visual definition of the functional areas to the overall space without creating physical constraint between the areas.

     The timbers added to the space are solid douglas fir timbers. They are not fake timbers. All the timbers are joined with custom styled gusset plates and angle braces. The plates and braces were drawn in CAD software for precise fabrication specifications. A local fabrication shop used the specs in a CNC gas plasma cutter to cut the plates from 1/4" steel sheet. All the pieces were then powder coated with a textured, black finish.

     The timbers are non-structural in this installation, they do appear to be real structural elements. All timbers have been quite solidly affixed to the structure of the home, but none support the weight of the home. All timbers are gusset joined with numerous lag bolts through the custom fabricated plates.

This view is from the entry of the home, looking through the conversation space and into one end of the dining room. The initial timber set has been placed and solidly lag bolted to the structure of the home. The three somewhat oval plates on the face of the far upright timer hide heavy lag bolts that lock the timber to the structure of the home. The joints horizontal and vertical timbers have gusset plates on both sides (and both ends) of the timber set. Lag bolts through the plates hold the timber set solidly in place. (Click on the image at left to open a full size view.)
 
This is the same view from the main entry, but the camera angle has been elevated to show the height of the vaulted ceiling. Another vertical timber will be added to the timber set. It will stand in the center of the horizontal beam and will appear to support the roof, and will in fact be gusseted into the ridge beam visible in this view. (Click on the image at left to open a full size view.)
 
This is a view of the partial timber set taken from within the dining area looking into the conversation space. The black plates on the face of the vertical timber hide lag bolts that secure the timber to the structure of the home. Even at this stage, the timber set very clearly defines the two functional spaces, yet offers no physical barrier to the flow from one space to the other. (Click on the image at left to open a full size view.)
 
This view is, again, from the main entry, looking through the conversation area and into the dining room. The timber set is complete. (Click on the image at left to open a full size view.)
 
This is a view of the entry space from the conversation area. The horizontal beam that runs from the corner behind the hutch over the wall at the left was added during the project. Again, the beam is lag bolted into the structure of the home and appears to literally appear to come out of the wall on the left and disappears into the wall at the right. This single element gives very solid definition and boundary to the entry area without hindering flow from one space to the other. (Click on the image at left to open a full size view.)
 
A slightly closer view of the added horizontal beam that helps give definition between the entry and conversation spaces of the home. (Click on the image at left to open a full size view.)

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All content, including graphics and images, copyright 2010, Ed Reasoner, all rights reserved.